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Fri 22
Celso de Mello asks Federal Prosecution Office to consider Bolsonaro’s phone seizure

Celso de Mello asks Federal Prosecution Office to consider Bolsonaro’s phone seizure

May 22nd, 2020.

 

Good evening.

 

Brazilian Federal Supreme Court justice Celso de Mello has forwarded to the Federal Prosecution Office a request filed from political parties and members of Congress asking for the seizure and subsequent examination of president Jair Bolsonaro’s and his son, Carlos’s, cell phones. Former Brazilian Justice and Public Safety minister, Sergio Moro, was interviewed by Time Magazine, and declared he “didn’t enter the government to serve a master.” A study released by British medical journal The Lancet has indicated a higher death risk for patients hospitalized for COVID-19 after being ministered a treatment with hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine. Meanwhile, in Sweden, a study done by the country’s Public Health Agency indicated a smaller number of antibodies in the population of its capital, Stockholm, that it was previously expected; the country adopted less restrictive measures than the rest of the world in hopes that it would give them immunity against the novel coronavirus. Finally, a passenger plane with over 100 people on board crashed into a residential area of Karachi, Pakistan, shortly before landing.

 

Take a look at our highlights.

 

Celso de Mello asks Federal Prosecution Office to consider Bolsonaro’s phone seizure

Yesterday, Brazilian Federal Supreme Court justice Celso de Mello sent to the Federal Prosecution Office requests from political parties and members of Congress asking for the seizure of the cell phones of president Jair Bolsonaro and his son, Rio de Janeiro alderman Carlos Bolsonaro, and their subsequent examination. Requests have also been filed petitioning federal prosecutors to interview the president on the alleged suspicion of his interference with ongoing Federal Police investigations. Celso de Mello has received a video in which president Bolsonaro confronts former Justice minister Sergio Moro about appointing a new head of the Federal Police.

 

“I didn’t enter the government to serve a master,” Moro tells Time Magazine

Brazil’s former Justice and Public Safety minister, Sergio Moro, said in an interview with US magazine Time he did not enter president Jair Bolsonaro’s government “to serve a master”. In the interview, published yesterday, Moro discussed his career, from the Operation Car Wash days until he reached the office of minister. Commenting on his departure, Moro said his intention was not to “damage the government”, but added that he wouldn’t feel comfortable with his conscience “without explaining why I was leaving.” According to Moro, it was his ethos that moved him to resign, after learning that the president fired the Federal Police chief in order to install a lackey who would illegally provide him with confidential reports. Bolsonaro, who had previously celebrated Moro as a “national treasure”, denied all allegations and called Moro a “Judas”.

 

Hydroxychloroquine study indicates higher death risk for hospitalized patients

A new worldwide study involving the use of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in patients diagnosed with COVID-19 has shown that the medication is associated with a higher death risk, as well as cardiac arrhythmia, compared to people who were not prescribed the substance. The study, released by The Lancet medical journal this morning assessed the medical records of 96 thousand patients hospitalized in 671 hospitals throughout the six continents. While the mortality rate among patients who did not use the medication was established as 9.3 percent, 18 percent of people who used hydroxychloroquine died, and 23.8 percent of those who used it combined with an antibiotic did not survive the treatment. With chloroquine, the mortality rate was 16.4 percent when the substance was used alone, and 22.2 percent when combined with an antibiotic.

 

Antibody study says 7.3 percent have COVID-19 immunity in Sweden’s capital

7.3 percent of the inhabitants of Stockholm, Sweden’s capital, have developed antibodies against the novel coronavirus, according to a study published by the country’s Public Health Agency. The Scandinavian country adopted less restrictive measures for the contention of COVID-19 than the rest of the world, appealing instead to its citizens’ individual responsibility in order to prevent themselves from being infected. Epidemiologist Anders Tegnell, responsible for the Swedish strategy in the fight against the pandemic, tried to minimize the low figures claiming it represented the situation weeks ago and by now “a little more than 20 percent” of the population had probably contracted the virus, but the Public Health Agency had been expecting about 25 percent to have been infected by May 1st.

 

Plane with over 100 people on board crashes in Pakistan

A Pakistan International Airlines passenger plane crashed into a residential area in the country’s largest city, Karachi. The plane had taken off from Lahore with 99 passengers and seven crew members aboard, according to local authorities, and was about to land in Karachi when it fell down. The local press informed that the pilot lost contact with the control tower one minute before the scheduled landing time, and said he was experiencing technical issues. Soldiers are at the crash site, and, so far, eleven bodies have been removed from the rubble.

 

Until next week, good evening.